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Friday, January 06, 2017

Job 10-13

There is an expression--I think--that is "the faith of Job/el fe de Job" (or as google translate prefers, "el fe de trababjo").  That is, a recognition that throughout his trials and tribulations, Job never loses faith in God.  He is upset that his is being mistreated the whole time.  I've experienced this with our legal system when I feel that my case is so strong that it befuddles me when a judge rules against me.  The reason I am upset is precisely because I continue to have faith in the system.

Chapters 10-13 are about the Confidence of Job/la Confienza de Job.  In response to his friends, who may be his enemies/enemigas, he states that not only is he upright and blameless/recto y intachable, but he says ask the birds and the fish and the animals.  You cannot find something against me.  This is interesting in the context of seemingly inexplicable tragedy.  Would most of us have the confidence of Job that we did nothing to bring it on ourselves? I think not.

As a result of his confidence Job is able to not that "Lo que el derriba, nadie lo levanta/What he tears down cannot be rebuilt," in reference to God. Job 13:14. Then goes on to say that God can deceive leaders and the wise.  He identification of God's destructive power, not necessarily directed toward Israel's enemies (this story being set before Israel) is interesting.

Text note:  Is this sarcasm:  "Doubtless you are the only people who matter, and wisdom will die with you!"  Job 12:2 (capturing Job's response to Zophar)

3 comments:

Matt Dick said...

Last question first... yes! I think Jon has lots of sarcasm from the mouth of God. Also, a fair amount of black humor.

The confidence of Job is also amazing, but even more amazing is that he's *right* about his blamelessness.

JimII said...

I really enjoy reading Job. I would go see it as a play.

Matt Dick said...

No question it would make a great dramatic play. Interesting, gruesome, and intellectually compelling